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Your Cockatiels Health Ask questions about your cockatiels health here.

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  #11  
Old 04-13-2017, 02:23 AM
Dragona Dragona is offline
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Okokok, everybody, just a quick update to calm the situation: He's fine today.

Yesterday i gave him bicarb (?) with water and a droplet of lemon (it was one of the remedies on the link EllenD gave) then let him without more food for the night.
Today (minutes ago) i went to check and his crop isn't bloaty at all. I don't know if i overreacted or if the bicrb with water helped, but it's gone. I gave him his morning feeding (wich he happily chugged) and his crop filled as normal. No signs of pain, of discomfort or else: just a hungry tiel.

@tielfan: Yesterday his crop seemed... "normal but void", as in "normal", not red, green, yellow or else, just translucent (not much, i couldn't see food inside) and there wasn't food inside. I checked, double checked, but there was nothing in there, not even water, i think just air.

@EllenD: 2 hours may seem not much, but to me, a carless 21 yo living alone and reliying on pubblic transportation, are way too many to even try. Not for lack of will, but not only it's difficult to reach 2h+ away in bus/train, having a sick tiel with you is the easiest way to get the baby hurt, lost or scared. So please, don't assume it was out of laziness i didn't bring him to the vet, i WOULD have done 10+ hours of car if possible, and today, if things were not better, I would've gone to the closest vet here.

Thank you everybody for the concern, and sorry for the scare (?)
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  #12  
Old 04-13-2017, 11:15 AM
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I'm glad he's fine today! I don't normally look at my babies' crops after they fledge so I don't know for sure, but it's possible that it's normal for them to sometimes have an empty crop at this age. Adult birds don't keep their crops stuffed full all the time, and this baby has reached the age where it starts learning adult habits and adult skills.

He'll still need some handfeeding for a few more weeks, but it's time now for him to start learning to feed himself. As he becomes more skilled at this he'll need less handfeeding until eventually he doesn't need it at all. The feeding right before bedtime will be the lat one to go, they need more food at this time to help them get through the night.

Did we talk about weaning foods in the other thread? Basically you provide him with easy to eat foods like millet spray, vegetables, and grains that have been soaked or cooked to make them soft. Offer them spread out on a flat surface like a table top or a plate, so he can pick around the ground like he would in the wild. Offer some harder to eat foods too like pellets and hard seeds. It will take him longer to learn to eat those, but he needs to have them available so he can practice.

When you've got a sick bird and the nearest vet is hours away, one of the factors that you need to consider is whether the stress of the trip will overwhelm the bird and make its condition worse, and whether staying at home giving the best care you can manage might give the bird a better chance of recovery. You have to balance the possible benefits of the trip against the risks. There are no easy answers to problems like this, and not everyone will make the same decision.
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Last edited by tielfan; 04-13-2017 at 11:20 AM..
  #13  
Old 04-13-2017, 11:34 AM
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So glad he's okay!
 
  #14  
Old 04-13-2017, 06:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enigma731 View Post
Once again (like I said in the other thread), aspiration is not a risk unless you shove the tube down the airway instead of the esophagus (which almost physically impossible to do.) Crop tubing is actually much safer in this regard than delivering anything orally. Have you personally used a crop needle before?

I also think it's a hugely privileged statement to assume that everyone can drive two hours, and that "it's nothing." We don't even know if this bird has a crop problem, maybe let's not jump to "he's going to die."
I completely disagree, as I saw someone using a small, 1ml oral syringe go in the left side of the baby's beak, aiming diagonally to the right, and slowly push the formula, following the baby's head bobbing...Baby suddenly shook his head, gasped, and fell over dead.

Aspiration can happen at any time you are hand feeding a baby, you absolutely do not have to be putting the tube or syringe down the esophagus to aspirate a baby bird!

"Dance like nobody's watching..."
  #15  
Old 04-13-2017, 07:13 PM
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[QUOTE=EllenD;1357498]
Quote:
Originally Posted by enigma731 View Post
I completely disagree, as I saw someone using a small, 1ml oral syringe go in the left side of the baby's beak, aiming diagonally to the right, and slowly push the formula, following the baby's head bobbing...Baby suddenly shook his head, gasped, and fell over dead.

Aspiration can happen at any time you are hand feeding a baby, you absolutely do not have to be putting the tube or syringe down the esophagus to aspirate a baby bird!

"Dance like nobody's watching..."
I'm not sure you read my post. You are describing aspiration during oral administration, which is different from gavage feeding with a crop needle. You cannot aspirate with a crop needle because the formula/medication is going directly into the crop, which is not connected to the airway. There is no physical way for the food to get into the lungs from there unless you've put the tube into the lungs instead of the crop. When doing a crop flush, you do not give anything orally.

But again, I'm not interested in derailing threads to argue with you. I'm glad this bird seems to be fine.
  #16  
Old 04-13-2017, 08:58 PM
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This picture from the article at http://www.internationalcockatielres...-utensils.html has an illustration of using a crop needle and tells how to use it. You literally stick the tube or needle down the baby's throat so it's inside the crop. I've never done it so it looks very scary to me, but people who have actually done it say it's not as bad as it looks.



It's relatively easy to aspirate a chick with the ordinary short-tipped syringes that we use for normal handfeeding. You're just depositing the food in the mouth, and it's possible to squirt it into the wrong tube. A crop needle bypasses this area so you can't miss.
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  #17  
Old 04-13-2017, 09:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tielfan View Post
This picture from the article at http://www.internationalcockatielres...-utensils.html has an illustration of using a crop needle and tells how to use it. You literally stick the tube or needle down the baby's throat so it's inside the crop. I've never done it so it looks very scary to me, but people who have actually done it say it's not as bad as it looks.



It's relatively easy to aspirate a chick with the ordinary short-tipped syringes that we use for normal handfeeding. You're just depositing the food in the mouth, and it's possible to squirt it into the wrong tube. A crop needle bypasses this area so you can't miss.
I thought that too, until I actually tried it. It's not scary at all. You don't even have to push it in, it falls right down into the crop when you have it at the right angle, and it's not uncomfortable for the bird. The only issues I've ever had were birds who were generally unhappy with being toweled. Oral med administration, on the other hand, is much scarier and riskier.
  #18  
Old 04-13-2017, 09:33 PM
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You have experience with medical procedures in general, so it might be easier for you than it is for the rest of us! But other people without medical experience have also said that it's not that bad.
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  #19  
Old 04-13-2017, 09:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tielfan View Post
You have experience with medical procedures in general, so it might be easier for you than it is for the rest of us! But other people without medical experience have also said that it's not that bad.
I didn't when I learned to crop feed But fair point, I am probably less squeamish than some about things like this.
  #20  
Old 04-14-2017, 12:35 AM
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I imagine that I could do it if I had to. But I'm hoping that I never have to!
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